We move into the NT

Where are we now ? http://goo.gl/maps/mYd3H
Hi everyone,
It is a few days since we have posted as we have been out of Telstra range and, as a few of you have noted, had a few issues with our email.
We will try and fill in the gaps without raving on too much.
Saturday 25 May 2013
We spent the day in Halls Creek and decided to get on the bike and check out some of the local sights. About five Ks out of town on the 56k access road to Sawpit Gorge, one such site, we decided our one wheel drive 300kg touring bike was not suited to the unsealed and rough corrugated road. We gingerly turned around and headed back into town. On the way we saw the turnoff to another one of the local sites, a rock formation named “China Wall”. It was also unsealed but just 2k long so, on the advice of a car driver just coming out, we decided to tackle it. The road got progressively worse until we hit a 100m long stretch of loose sand which saw us fishtailing through it in true dirt bike fashion. The last bit was a steep little pinch down to the car park with a big deep washout right across the road. Ros got off and I carefully nursed our 300kg brute down to the bottom. The trip back was no better but we finally made it out again unscathed (almost). Here is a little YouTube clip of some of the ride in>>http://youtu.be/krymhpYI0E4  We think we will be very selective about these side roads in future. Halls Creek is also a “dry” town which just means those who have a monopoly to sell alcohol can charge what they like. We had a couple of drinks at the motel bar but declined to take out a bank loan to make a proper session of it. We are off to Kunanurra and Lake Argyle tomorrow.

This is the China Wall that all the fuss was about. Nice but not spectacular!

This is the China Wall that all the fuss was about. Nice but not spectacular!

Sunday 26 May 2013
The 400k ride to the Lake Argyle resort on the banks of the huge Lake Argyle was absolutely stunning. About 200km out of Halls Creek we left the Savanah type country and headed into the Bungle Bungle region. The red hills and mountains were just fantastic. We must have turned on the HelmetCam video dozens of time as each new breathtaking vista came into view. I (the rider) was so excited when we came to some winding road through the hills. After many thousands of kilometres of relatively straight roads it was such a buzz (for the rider) to cruise around some nice sweepy bends. Boab trees were everywhere and the countryside looked just terrific. I will post a couple of these videos tomorrow if I have time. We picked up supplies at Kunanurra on the way through and the 70km ride into the resort was equally picturesque. This was only surpassed with the views of the lake from the resort when we arrived. We will be taking a sunset cruise on the lake tomorrow and will check out their famous Infinity Pool in the morning. A very pleasant place with very nice accommodation albeit our most expensive so far (but still worth it).

Some of the stunning country along the road to Kunanurra

Some of the stunning country along the road to Kunanurra

Kimberley road stop

Kimberley road stop

Lake Argyle

Lake Argyle

Monday 27 May 2013
We spent the day at the very nice Lake Argyle resort. We had an obligatory but rather chilly dip in their Infinity pool and took a very pleasurable sunset cruise on the lake. The sunset colours in this part of the world have to be seen to be believed.

A rather chilly dip in the resort "Infinity" pool

A rather chilly dip in the resort “Infinity” pool

One of the more than thirty thousand freshwater crocodiles in the lake

One of the more than thirty thousand freshwater crocodiles in the lake

Lake Argyle sunset

Lake Argyle sunset

Tuesday 28 May 2013
The fairly long 530 Km run we planned today to Katherine in the NT was made even longer by the need to take a 70 Km diversion to Kunanurra to refuel. This was exacerbated by a 1.5 hour time loss as we switched time zones making our long 600Km ride also a long day. The day was sunny and fairly warm at 33c.The the countryside was very picturesque with lots of Boab trees and Savannah type country interspersed with beautiful red rocky hills. There were even a few gentle bends to remind us we were still actually riding a motorcycle. A very nice, although somewhat warm and long ride. We rolled into Katherine after crossing the border into the NT at around 5.30pm with the lengthening shadows across the road giving us a couple of close brushes with our kangaroo friends.

Here is another little video we took a few days ago crossing a stream to reach a rest stop on the other side. >>>http://youtu.be/TGCY_FEK7QM

Here is another video of passing one of the numerous road trains we encountered>>>>http://youtu.be/FA11n8ybzcA

Here is one of the videos we took of the country along the road between Kununurra WA and Katherine NT alongside the Victoria River. It is 3 minutes and a bit longer than the others but I couldn’t figure out which part to cut out so I left it intact >>>http://youtu.be/wtiSOLaniNA
Cheers
Ros and Dick

 

 

Off into the Kimberleys

Where are we now? http://goo.gl/maps/BRGN4
Monday 20 and Tuesday 21 May 2013
Took a tour around Broome. We experienced some really heavy rain in the afternoon. We had planned to take a camel ride along Cable beach but it was called off due to the rain. 🙁
We had a sleep-in the next day then spent the day walking around Broome. First up we checked out their Museum which was interesting then up to China Town for fish and chips for lunch before taking the bus down to Cable Beach for our sunset camel ride along the beach. This was terrific and the sunset was picture perfect. We took the bus back to China Town for a Chinese dinner which was a bit ordinary. We are setting off again tomorrow headed for Fitzroy Crossing staying in a safari tent.

Storm clouds over Roebuck Bay - Broome

Storm clouds over Roebuck Bay – Broome

The picturesque Anistasia's Pool Broome

The picturesque Anistasia’s Pool
Broome

An Osprey fishing at Broome

An Osprey fishing at Broome

Afternoon downpour in Broome

Afternoon downpour in Broome

Camels on Cable Beach - Broome

Camels on Cable Beach – Broome

Camel ride on Cable Beach Broome

Camel ride on Cable Beach Broome

Sunset over Cable Beach - Broome

Sunset over Cable Beach – Broome

Wednesday 22 and Thursday 23 May 2013
Our 400 Km ride today took us into the famed Kimberly region. The weather was cloudy but fine with a very comfortable 27c max. The roads were mostly straight with low trees and lots of termite mounds. There was also lots of cattle grazing along the road verges and, at one stage, a group of Brumbies. The   feature for the day was the many beautiful Boab trees that abounded throughout the green bush. There has been a lot of rain recently and the country is very green and the road verge very soft. This made it almost impossible to pull over and photograph some of this beautiful pastoral county. Here is a short YouTube video to give you a flavour of the ride>>http://youtu.be/cfuth6A73Ic There were just two rest stops and one roadhouse along the whole 400k. We were caught a bit unawares when we got to Fitzroy Crossing and found that it was a “dry” town. We managed (at great expense) to pick up a few “essential” supplies at the Lodge.
We spent the next day at Fitzroy Crossing and rode the 20km out to the Geike  Gorge National park to take a boat trip up the Fitzroy River to see the spectacular Geike Gorge. This was a great experience. The rest of the day we just vegged out at our palatial safari tent (c/w ensuite) on the banks of the Fitzroy river.

An "old man" Boab tree alongside the road

An “old man” Boab tree alongside the road

Who said Ros wouldn't camp!!

Who said she wouldn’t camp!!

Geike Gorge

Part of Geike Gorge

One of the many "locals" at Geike Gorge

One of the many “locals” at Geike Gorge

Another one of the many "locals" at Geike Gorge

Another one of the many “locals” at Geike Gorge

Fitzroy River just at the end of the "wet"

Fitzroy River at the end of the “wet”

Thursday 23 May 2013
The day started with a number of urgent calls and messages on my (Dick’s) mobile advising that my Gmail account had been hacked. Every one of the 350 or so contacts in my address book were sent a bogus email purporting to be from me asking for money. Not only that but the Nigerian B*!x!* (I was able to trace it back to Nigeria) then proceeded to delete all my emails and contacts preventing a followup message from me. I think we covered all bases but hope nobody was duped into sending any money. My old email has now been shut down and I have a new address. After trying to settle this kerfuffle we belatedly got on the road at 10am heading just 300 km away to Halls Creek. The weather was fine and sunny although we battled against a fairly strong headwind most of the way putting the windscreen up and the fuel consumption down. The country was mostly open, flat and Savannah like (I guess that’s why they call this part of the Highway the Savannah Way 😮 ) . Occasionally Interspersed with picturesque red rocky outcrops and escarpments. We were fortunate to spot four huge Brolgas feeding alongside the road during the morning. Termite mounds were everywhere with some kangaroo-like ones poking up right on the road verge causing a little heartache until correctly identified at close quarters. There were just two rest stops enroute with no civilisation between Fitzroy Crossing and Halls Creek. We stopped at the second rest stop for lunch and found a surprising and pleasant picnic spot by a river. We are taking an enforced rest day here in Halls Creek tomorrow as Kunanurra is totally booked out for their Kimberley Moon Festival and Rodeo on Saturday night. We plan to bypass Kunanurra on Sunday and stay at the Argyle Lake Resort Sunday and Monday.
Bye for now
Ros and Dick

Brolgas by the road

Brolgas by the road

The Kimberley Savanah meets the red rock

The Kimberley Savannah meets the red rock

A rare picnic spot by the road

A rare picnic spot by the road

More Kimberley vista

More Kimberley vista

 

 

 

We reach the halfway point as we “sweep” into Broome

Where are we?>>http://goo.gl/maps/POKtX
Friday 17 May 2013
We rode 40km to Roebourne to take an all day bus tour of the Rio Tinto ship loading facility. This huge facility was very interesting and is currently being expanded to more than double its current capacity. The tour took us right into the plant and we saw some of the huge equipment up close including the machine for picking up and emptying two x 200 tonne railway cars at a time. We lunched at the historic ghost town Cossack on the coast. There is building work going on everywhere in Karratha including three very large 10 storey apartment buildings to house “fly-in Fly-out” workers. They say it costs over $400 per week to rent a caravan site about 5k out of town and the average three bedroom house costs $850,000. The lady who was our tour guide said her whole family (5) work at the Rio plant. We are tackling the first section of the long 850 km run to Broome tomorrow and will overnight (probably in a donga) at a remote roadhouse about midway.

Some of the new worker Fly-in Fly-out accommodation being constructed in Karratha

Some of the new worker Fly-in Fly-out accommodation being constructed in Karratha

Overlooking the giant Cape Lambert, iron ore ship loading facility

Overlooking the giant Cape Lambert, iron ore ship loading facility

Like giant Preying Mantes

Like giant Preying Mantes

Saturday 20 May 2013
We set off from Karratha in cloud and some light rain but this soon fined up to be clear and sunny all day. The 400 km ride for the day was through flat and open country which is showing the effects of some recent rain. There is lots of green and the country looks great. We occasionally came upon some red rocky hills which periodically appear out of the flat countryside. We bypassed the very busy mining and ore ship loader at Port Hedland which was obviously undergoing huge expansion works much the same as Cape Lambert. The road train traffic had to be seen to be believed with dozens of huge four trailer ore carriers going in all directions. We were pulled over between Karratha and Port Hedland to allow three huge road transports past carrying mining equipment as wide as the whole road presumably destined for the port expansion at Cape Lambert. See the short Youtube clip at the end of this post to give you a flavour of the ride. We stopped off at the old mining town of Whim Creek expecting to make a comfort stop but found the place deserted and derelict. We stayed at the Pardoo Roadhouse overnight midway between Karratha and Broome in the middle of nowhere. Our “room” was a bare Donga with shared camp facilities. Not quite up to Ros’s minimum required accommodation standard but there is nowhere else!. Three days in the Mercure at Broome should offset this minor slip-up in accommodation standard.

The Pardoo Road house accommodation

The Pardoo Road house accommodation

A local resident at Pardoo Road house

A local resident at Pardoo Road house

The abandoned Whim Creek Pub

The abandoned Whim Creek Pub

Sharing a roadstop with one of the many road trains

Sharing a roadstop with one of the many road trains

One of the huge four trailer ore road trains buzzing up and down the road near Port Hedland

One of the huge four trailer ore road trains buzzing up and down the road near Port Hedland

A short Youtube clip of some of the ride >>http://youtu.be/9fkjEm1hX5Q

Sunday 21 May 2013
We got going early today for our 470 Km run into Broome. We copped a bit of light rain first up but this did not last long. The rest of the day was mostly sunny with the temperature hitting 33c most of the day which is the highest for the trip so far. The ride was uneventful with just two isolated roadhouses the only civilisation for the entire trip. The run from the Sandfire Roadhouse into Broome was over 300km and the longest non-civilisation leg so far on the whole trip. The road was mostly flat and typical low scrub but about 50 km out of Broome it opened out to cleared pasture off to the horizon. Huge herds of cattle were dotted across the landscape like ants. We reached Broome at around 3pm and just missed a heavy rain shower. The temperature was still +30c but the humidity must have been close to 100%. This is now roughly our halfway point in both time (day 40) and distance (10,243 km).  We plan to stay here for 3 nights and see some of the sights tomorrow including the obligatory camel ride along Cable Beach.

Cheers for now
Ros and Dick

 

 

 

The towns are getting further apart

Where are we ? http://goo.gl/maps/45yCe
Wednesday 15 May 2013
We took a rest day in Exmouth and enjoyed our first clear and sunny day for weeks. We ran into our Sydney neighbours Bob and Betty who live on the same floor as us at Castle Hill. They are also traveling around Australia in their Trakka Motorhome. We had a great natter with them over coffee. It is amazing that we spoke more to them 8,000 kms from home in Exmouth than we normally do when they are just 30 metres away!. We rode down the Ningaloo Coast to see some of the sights. It is obviously a fisherman’s paradise judging from the huge number of boat trailers parked at the remote launching ramp where we saw the biggest trailered boat we have ever seen (towed by a huge Chevrolet Silverado) being launched. The local industry of taking people out to the nearby reef, to swim with the huge whale sharks, was in full swing with boatloads of swimmers coming and going. Not surprisingly, Ros could not be persuaded to give it a try 😮

Ros checking out Robert and Betty's compact Motorhome

Ros checking out Robert and Betty’s compact Motorhome

The giant trailer boat rig at Ningalu Coast boat ramp

The giant trailer boat rig at Ningaloo Coast boat ramp

A few of the boat trailers waiting for their charges to return at the Ningalu Coast boat rampome

A few of the boat trailers waiting for their charges to return at the Ningaloo Coast boat ramp

Thursday 16 May 2013
We got going at 8am for our long haul to Karratha on a fine and sunny day. Our first leg from Exmouth to the Nanaturra road house was 290 km without any  civilisation in between. This is our longest so far. The run into Nanaturra was mostly straight with flat low scrubby country. We had to contend with lots of roaming livestock again with sheep and cattle grazing along the road verges and roaming across the road in front of us on a number of occasions. The country was fairly green and we crossed several rivers that actually had water in them. The ride was quite pleasant. After the midway point we came into Dampier Range which was very prehistoric looking country. It was very picturesque. The road undulated a bit more and made the riding a little more enjoyable. Grey Nomads were in abundance as usual in all manner of vehicles and campers. Every 10 km or so we went over cattle grids. It is hard to figure out their purpose as most were devoid of any associated fencing allowing stock to just walk around them. Very strange!. We rocked into Karratha around 3 pm after a big 600 km day. The towns are getting further apart with just a couple of roadhouses between Exmouth and Karratha. Boy what a buzz this place has. It is reputed to be the fastest growing town in Australia and we don’t doubt it for one minute. It is also, unfortunately, a bit pricey with our modest motel setting a record so far for our trip. We are staying here tomorrow and taking a tour of some of the huge Rio Tinto ore handling facilities in the area. Should be interesting.
Bye for now
Ros and Dick

More straight roads and flat, green scrubby country

More straight roads and flat, green scrubby country

The colourful Ashburton River adjacent to the Nanaturra Roadhouse

The colourful Ashburton River adjacent to the Nanaturra Roadhouse

Some of the picturesque Dampier Range starting to pop up on the horizon

Some of the picturesque Dampier Range starting to pop up on the horizon

 
 

 

 

Onto the Pilbara Coast

Where are we ? http://goo.gl/maps/XZRJf
Tuesday 14 May 2013
We spent the day exploring the delights of Carnarvon. Their historic 1 mile jetty is their big claim to fame although it was built in the late 1800’s and is definitely showing its age. We were advised by a local motorcyclist to visit their Blow Holes on the coast “just up the road” . He cautioned us to be very careful of the bends toward the end of the access road. The visit turned out to be a 160 Km round trip and the fearsome bends turned out to be about half a dozen long, full speed, sweepers!!!.  Me-thinks the riders in this part of the world are too accustomed to straight roads!. We came back along the Gascoyne River where large scale irrigation had all manner of crops growing out of the desert including bananas, mangos, tomatoes and all manner of fruit and vegetables . Truly a sight to behold.

Part of the Historic "one mile" jetty at Carnarvon showing its age

Part of the Historic “one mile” jetty at Carnarvon showing its age

One of the Blow Holes in action at Point Quobba 80 Km north of Carnarvon

One of the Blow Holes in action at Point Quobba 80 Km north of Carnarvon

Bananas in the desert at Carnarvon WA on the Gascoyne River

Bananas in the desert at Carnarvon WA on the Gascoyne River

Wednesday 15 May 2013
The 400k ride from Carnarvon to Exmouth was uneventful in cool, cloudy and sometimes wet weather. The country was mostly flat and featureless with low trees and scrub. The country subtly changed however every now and then. We came upon a long stretch where large termite nests 2m+ high popped up everywhere amongst the low scrub. They made the countryside look like a giant cemetery. Very spectacular and eerie. Another time the scenery morphed into flat heath type country then, another time bare red dirt. We saw lots of feral goats, sheep and cattle feeding along the road verges and had one minor deviation to avoid a sheep who decided to dawdle across the road in front of us. We stopped in at Coral Bay on the coast which was jam packed with Grey Nomads and their massive caravan rigs. It was a pretty spot but we did not like the crowds and were happy to move on the more hospitable Exmouth.   We are spending the day here in Exmouth tomorrow to take in some of the local sights before heading off on a long 600km leg to Karratha on Thursday.

Grey Nomad alley at Coral Bay WA - Count the satellite dishes !!

Grey Nomad alley at Coral Bay WA – Count the satellite dishes !!

A friendly lunch guest at Coral bay WA

A friendly lunch guest at Coral bay WA

A few of the thousands of eerie termite mounds dotted along the road to Exmouth WA

A few of the thousands of eerie termite mounds dotted along the road to Exmouth WA

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Off into the remote North West WA

Where are we? >>http://goo.gl/maps/Gy3T3

Friday 10 may 2013
We slept through another deluge dry and snug at Kalbarri waking to a fine morning.  We left early so we could backtrack a bit to look at the spectacular cliffs along the Kalbarri headland. The 400km trip from Kalbarri to Denham was mostly straight, flat and treeless. We met up with three Honda Goldwing + trailer rigs at the Billabong Roadhouse. They were also doing the big loop in the same direction as us and hailed from Canberra. They were carrying a large amount of camping gear with them . Definitely not mean and lean like us 🙂 We arrived at Denham around 2pm and booked a cruise and a lift to Monkey Mia for tomorrow. There is also a big fishing competition on in town this weekend. We enjoyed a home cooked meal in our beachfront unit as we watched out our front door spellbound as a family of emus walked down the middle of the road.

Some of the spectacular Kalbarri Cliffs

Some of the spectacular Kalbarri Cliffs

Our fellow RoundOz travellers on Honda Goldwings

Our fellow RoundOz travellers on Honda Goldwings

Emu family out for an evening walk at Denham WA

Emu family out for an evening walk at Denham WA

Bangers and mash on the communal barbie at Denham

Bangers and mash on the communal barbie at Denham

Saturday 11 May 2013
We took a lay day in Denham and got a lift the 28 Km to see the famed dolphins at Monkey Mia. We then had a great day on the catamaran ARISTOCAT with three other couples spotting dolphins, a dugong and a giant Manta ray. We also visited the Blue Lagoon floating pearl factory. Had a cheap dinner at the fishing competition marque (seafood and salad). Listened and danced to “Leather and Lace” and met up with a couple of fellow Grey Nomads Max and Roe.
A good night !

Feeding the dolphins at Monkey Mia

Feeding the dolphins at Monkey Mia

The floating pearl factory on Shark Bay

The floating pearl factory on Shark Bay

A rare dugong surfaces for air in Shark Bay

A rare dugong surfaces for air in Shark Bay

Sunday 12 May 2013
We set off for Carnarvon from Denham on Mothers day with the weather clear but very windy. Denham is our most westerly destination of our trip and is the western most town on the Australian mainland. From now on we start making our way back East again. We also crossed the 26th Parallel today as we headed north. The 400 km trip to Carnarvon was mostly straight and through low treeless scrubby country. Here is a short HelmetCam video to give you an idea of what the country looks like. (Turn your sound right down before you play it as I forgot to edit out the wind noise and replace it with some cool music and I can’t be bothered going back and uploading it all again 🙂 )  http://youtu.be/nKQKz9QMHqw    In spite of this, the country is still very scenic with the occasional hill giving spectacular views of the surrounding countryside. On one such hill there was an amazing and unexpected collection of garden gnomes acting as sentinels looking out over the country. They were presumably left there by fellow travellers and on closer inspection, each one had been inscribed in memory of some loved one. Very poignant!. This area is very remote and anyone working in this region qualifies for a remote location tax rebate. There are no towns between Denham and Carnarvon with the only civilisation being two roadhouses in between. There are surprisingly few bugs in this part of the world and we have not had to clean our visors for over a week now. This is unheard of back east where every hour or so would be the norm. We saw lots of feral goats along the side of the road and fresh kangaroo road-kill every kilometre or so. A couple of truckies gave us dire warnings about kangaroos and goats darting out from the side of the road so we spent most of the day hugging the white line down the middle of the road to give us maximum reaction time in the event of the sudden appearance of a Skippy or a Billy. In spite of their warnings we did not see any live kangaroos all day. Judging from the huge number of recent kills along the road however, there warning is to be taken seriously. There is no way we would travel late afternoon or at night. We are spending the day in Carnarvon tomorrow to check out the local sights before heading off again for Exmouth on Tuesday. We spent a couple of hours in the dark tonight and very nearly missed out on dinner  thanks to a general power blackout. We had just finished our luke warm dinner by candlelight in the motel restaurant when the power came back on.

The gnome sentinels

The gnome sentinels

Top of the world - Enroute to Carnarvon WA

Top of the world – Enroute to Carnarvon WA

 

 

 

 

 

A great ride to Kalbarri WA

Hi everyone,
We have now been away from home for 30 days and have travelled 7,229 Kilometres.
We had torrential rain and wild winds all night at the small coastal fishing village of Cervantes (we were warm and snug in our motel room) but we were a little concerned at what the morning would hold particularly given the Severe wind warnings that were being broadcast . Morning saw the rain had stopped  but not the wind which was still wild and gusty. We decided to take a 60km detour inland to get away from our planned coastal Indian Ocean Highway route to pick up the Brand Highway more inland.  We were rewarded with some beautiful undulating country with low scrubby trees which were mostly beautiful banksias. We experience some wild rain squalls which generally passed in 10 minutes or so as we reached the Brand Highway and headed north again toward our next planned overnight stop at Geraldton. We encountered our first serious road train (three trailers) during one of these squalls which actually turned out to be two of them (six trailers) travelling in convoy. Passing them both in the wind and rain turned out to be an interesting exercise. Check out the video. http://youtu.be/k2DjKvAffcI When we reached Eneabba we decided, after enjoying “The best coffee on the Brand!” at the Eneabba Roadhouse,  to take another inland diversion to a place called Three Springs then on to Minganew where we saw the longest grain storage shed we have ever seen (It must have been at least 500 metres long). This was obviously a major grain railhead and wheat growing area evidenced by the wide wheat fields we rode through.  As we turned back toward the coast the winds and rain squalls noticeably increased in severity until we reached the coast again at Dongara 60 km south of Geraldton. The run up into Geraldton was interesting with wild gusty cross winds all the way breaking into a fierce storm just as we arrived at our Motel for the night.  A challenging but exhilarating ride with some magnificent scenery along the way.
We experienced torrential rain and wild winds again overnight in Geraldton and were bracing ourselves for another uncomfortable ride in the morning. We were pleasantly surprised when we opened the door of our room in the morning and saw the sun 🙂 We set off for our short run to Kalbarri after a moving visit to the HMAS Sydney II memorial on the hill overlooking Geraldton particularly when Ros located the name of her Great Uncle Max in the memorial wall. We again decided to take the “scenic route” and took a 60 Km inland diversion and were rewarded by seeing some wonderful undulating wheat and sheep country in the huge Chapman Valley. The landscape was also occasionally filled with some very distinctive flat top hills or Mesas. We enjoyed a stop at the historic Sanford Homestead (1853) enroute back to the coast lunching at the small coastal fishing village of Port Gregory. This was a very unusual place with the Port formed by a natural reef running for about 5 Kms along parallel to the coastline. The wild seas were crashing over the reef some 500m offshore whilst the “harbour”  area was relatively quite inside the reef. The run into Kalbarri saw some very nice coastal pastures and seaviews. All in all another great day’s riding.

Now that's what I call a picnic table

Now that’s what I call a picnic table

The giant grain shed at Mingenew WA

The giant grain shed at Mingenew WA

Fort Denison Beach

Fort Denison Beach

Guess which way the prevailing wind blows - Straight off the Indian Ocean!

Guess which way the prevailing wind blows – Straight off the Indian Ocean!

A coastal rural scene on the road to Geraldton

A coastal rural scene on the road to Geraldton

RIP Great Uncle Max (one of the 654 lost souls on the HMAS Sydney II)

RIP Great Uncle Max (one of the 654 lost souls on the HMAS Sydney II)

The old Sanford Homestead (1853)

The old Sanford Homestead (1853)

The amazing Port Gregory WA

The amazing Port Gregory WA

Sunset over Kalbarri WA

Sunset over Kalbarri WA

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

We’re on the road again!

Where are we? http://goo.gl/maps/xrpBj

Hi everyone,
We are on the move again after a ten day Pitstop in Perth. We travelled from Margaret River to Perth in the rain 10 days ago passing through the Cowtown (otherwise known as Cowamarup) to give Ros her fix of black and white cows arriving at our good friend Joy’s place in Perth at around 3 15 pm. Joy had offered to put us up while we were in Perth but boy, did she go above and beyond with her hospitality. We enjoyed the sights of Perth, caught up with some other old friends, got the bike serviced (including new brake pads and front tyre) and generally had a great time, largely thanks to Joy.
We set off this morning after bidding a fond farwell, headed north up the WA coast to a nice little place called Cervantes. Enroute we visited the Pinnacles which is an area of very interesting rock formations which have appeared, courtesy of the wind out of the surrounding sand over the past half a million years or so. Come with us for a short ride through the Pinnacles (courtesy of YouTube) to give you an idea of this interesting area. http://youtu.be/2QXiOhLb-QA
We are headed for Geraldton tomorrow with a strong wind warning in place along the coast so we will be taking it nice and easy.
Bye for now.
Ros and Dick

Breakfast at Cowtown

Breakfast at Cowtown

Hillarys - Perth - 3,284 Km to Sydney - We have travelled 6,400 Km to get here ??

Hillarys – Perth – 3,284 Km to Sydney – We travelled over 6,400 Km to get here ??

Perth skyline from the Swan River

Perth skyline from the Swan River

HMAS (ex) Ovens at the fantastic WA Maritime Museum (also home of Australia II) at Freemantle

HMAS (ex) Ovens at the fantastic WA Maritime Museum (also home of Australia II) at Fremantle

Thanks for the great time Joy!

Thanks for the great time Joy!

One of the many beautiful Grass Trees prevalent in this part of the world

One of the many beautiful Grass Trees prevalent in this part of the world

Playing "Peek-a-boo" at the Pinnanles

Playing “Peek-a-boo” at the Pinnacles